Themes

GOLD MINING    •    GOLD IN NATURE    •    GOLD IN SOCIETY    •    GOLD IN ART

Captain Campbell Hardy

Coloured engraving showing gold miners walking up between a “street” of wooden shaft houses and tents.

Many organizations were formed to pursue scientific study and research, with amateur artists and scientists joining together to learn more about the natural history of their lands. The Nova Scotia Institute of Science (NSIS) is one of these groups, which grew out of the interest aroused by the display of the province’s natural resources at the London Exhibition.

Perhaps best known for his publication, Forest Life in Acadie, Captain Campbell Hardy, of the Royal Artillery, lived in Nova Scotia for over 15 years and was not only one of the organisers of the Nova Scotia Institute of Science, but also a reputable sportsman, naturalist, artist, writer, and amateur scientist. Trained as a topographical draughtsman at the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich, Hardy continued the tradition of British military artists who documented early Canada.

Coloured engraving of men with cradles and picks along the beach at The Ovens, NS.

A hand-coloured wood engraving of Goldwashing Near Lunenburg, published in the London Illustrated News, September 14, 1861. Based on a drawing by Captain Campbell Hardy.

AGNS: 1995.452

Acting as a correspondent, Hardy had several engravings based on his drawings published in the Illustrated London News in 1861 alongside detailed reports from him about Nova Scotia during the first gold rush.